How To Build A Window Planter

An extensive selection of cedar window boxes satisfies that craving for timeless garden arrangements. Derived from Northern White and Western Red varieties of the tree, these durable, natural planters are ideal for organic gardening. A cedar window box is also a joy because it provides options for display. Keep and enjoy the natural wood grain as is or add paint and stain to your green thumb's desire. Above you can see that I also added a couple of decorative corbels to the bottom of the planter.
Love the seating area you created below it too. The new custom rain gutter looks so much better. I did not notice them until the window box and shutters were installed. I called and ordered the rain gutter and downspout over the phone window planter boxes plans and had them delivered. Bore a pilot hole and counterbore for the second screw through the bracket just above the horizontal leg, where it will be hidden by the window box. Cost varies, depending on the type of window box you select.

The design below spells out ‘K’, but with a change in the project design, you can create one that spells out the alphabet of your choice. It is not always an easy adaptive step to make, but one that should be achievable for advance level crafters. It is the strain of the wood that adds even more charm to the DIY planter designIt is not very easy to find DIY planters that are modern, minimal and easy to make. This is even truer when wood is involved in the equation. But this simple and chic box planter beats the rule and painting it white obviously goes a long way in achieving the necessary result. Be it flowers or veggies this DIY planter works everywhereFull of flowers, this box-style planter is the perfect way to welcome your guests when placed in the front porch. Of course, it can be used as a flower box planter next to the window as well.
Using 2 inches screw at a slight angle, I drilled them into the box just enough so they were barely poking out the back. When it was time to install the box, I held it up centered on my handrail and marked where the railing spindles were located. I’m Casey, the voice behind The DIY Playbook. Together we’re creating our dream home in Chicago, one DIY project at a time. Once the primer dried , I gave the entire box two coats of paint.

It may be simple, but it’s eye-catching and gorgeous too. I love how the dark walnut stain makes this DIY window box look rustic and chic at the same time. Choosing a very simple design like this one allows the plants to be the sole focus of the window planter box.
Remember, we do custom window boxes with no additional custom fees. If you think you need a flower window box length that's not already in our shopping cart give us a call and we'll be happy to assist you or fill out our free quote form. There is nothing quite as attractive as a window box adorning the outside of a home. Bursting with color, window boxes add texture, depth and visual appeal to any home. With the proper care, window boxes will provide color all through the growing season.
I started with a plastic window box insert I found at a local home center. My plan was to create a wooden “wrap” that the insert could drop in to. I promise it will boost your curb appeal in a weekend.

I am Carol and I love to garden and cook (with a bit of DIY thrown in for fun.) I come from a long line of gardeners and have always loved to experiment with food and recipes. Join me as I cook and garden my way through life. The white and yellow shasta daisies in a simple white planter look fabulous. If your window is north facing where the sun is not so bright, you’ll have less care. But if it faces squarely south, you’ll have more care but can plant more color.
A wood planter box gets a colorful upgrade with painted pastel wood shims. For a rustic, weathered look, try the dry brush paint technique, leaving some of the wood from the shims exposed. Use a standard potting mix from your garden center, or mix your own using soil, peat, sawdust, sand, and a little bonemeal. It’s important to enough good potting soil around the plants so they sit firmly. Experienced gardeners can train climbing vines around the window frame for an ensemble effect. Connoisseurs may choose to add topiary forms as a focal point. Ivy or creeping fig topiaries or other identifiable shapes can capture the imagination.

Using a medium grit sandpaper, sand the window box down a bit so the edges are not rough. Paint or stain the window box , and let it sit overnight to dry. Once your box is constructed, it’s time to cut your trim pieces. Cut 1″x 2″ x 6 1/2″ and 1″x 2″ x 30″ pieces for the sides and front of your window box. Fill the window box with a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel in the bottom of the window box to allow excess water to drain. Cover the gravel with potting soil, filling the box to about an inch from top.
This collection features new custom block prints for Spring with my favorites, blues and greens. There are pillow covers, table runners, napkin sets, tea towels and fabric yardage for your special projects. You can see the hyacinth bulbs poking through! They add a wonderful perfume to the front steps. Later that week Emma and I primed and painted to match the house. Apply wood glue to the bottom of the trim pieces.
At the link you will find step-by-step instructions, materials and cut list free to download to build this cedar flower box for your window. We really love spending time out here and the window box Luke built just makes it more special. Nice window box and can’t wait to see how full it will get with those plants. I love what you have setting there in the last picture. Step 8– Find the stud positions in the wall and pre-drill holes in the back of the window box. We also ran some screws along the top to keep the top of the window box snug against the wall. I love the way it looks with the red shutters!

I have an easy step-by-step tutorial and also fun ideas on what to plant inside. It really changes the look of the whole house from the outside.
Window measurements in hand (our window is 48" wide), we went to our local home improvement store to look at wood options. Knowing we would ultimately be painting the wood with exterior grade paint, we decided on some inexpensive 1" x 8" x 8' common boards. We also purchased some decorative trim pieces, this one for the top of the box and this for the bottom and corners. We chose a 9 1/2″ board for the bottom and 6″ boards for the sides because that’s the dimensions we wanted for our window box.

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